The Storytellers of Empire

The nature of Empire is inherently duplicitous.  It lies as much to the world as it does to itself, laboriously weaving myths of its supposed virtue in order to shroud the mass grave it sits upon. This makes it incapable of any meaningful reflection when it comes to its crimes. After all, such an exercise would ultimately be its undoing. And even though there are many examples of pseudo contrition the insatiable impulse for self-glorification is interwoven through its fabric.  War is what Empire lies about the most; and the American Empire is not “exceptional” in this regard. On the contrary.  It has become an expert at its execution.

Since its founding the United States has manufactured threats to hackneyed and meaningless concepts like “liberty” or “freedom” to justify aggressive expansion, domination and exploitation.  Its founding mythology rooted in the supremacist lie of “Manifest Destiny” has excused its unending militarism as a supposedly noble response to a “barbaric” world that needs to be “civilized.”  And the war against Vietnam is perhaps one of the greatest examples of that imperial overreach.  It claimed millions of Vietnamese, Cambodian and Laotian lives. Millions more were maimed or displaced and at least 58,000 US troops lost their lives with many more coming home with broken bodies and lifelong psychic wounds. Today millions still suffer from the lasting effects of Agent Orange.

But in the years since this catastrophic war the American Empire has struggled to rebrand itself as the benevolent giant.  Unending forays into South and Central America, Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia and beyond have also made this task next to impossible.  Enter the professional obscurantist.  To make this self delusion possible they are essential and there are few as adept at it than Ken Burns. In his new PBS documentary series entitled “The Vietnam War;” the “many sides” narrative is being peddled again.  And in an era where a sitting US president makes the “many sides” argument to defend the violence of white supremacists against anti-fascists, this worldview is more than troubling.

“The Vietnam War” is, unsurprisingly, a project funded by the Bank of America and billionaire reactionary David Koch.  And it relies heavily upon former CIA agents and military generals for “perspective.”  This is what makes a series like this so insidious.  They ultimately serve a way of thinking that make past imperialistic wars not only forgivable, but current and future ones appear almost palatable and even inevitable.

The real Vietnam War should be revisited, but it should not be cast as an intervention with noble intentions to assist one side in a civil war.  South Vietnam was an invention of French colonialism and, later, US election rigging as they understood that communist candidate Hồ Chí Minh was likely to win. None of this is to absolve the Viet Cong of the atrocities they committed; but they should be understood in the context of an indigenous group fighting against a foreign invader who possessed far more military might.  And for the war to make sense to us today it must be looked at in this light, as the deliberate result of blatant and brutal imperialism.

The storytellers of Empire ultimately serve one purpose, to extol the glory of the Empire.  This might at times take on the veneer of humanization or even remorse, but at their core these are stories that absolve its crimes by portraying an even playing field where there was none.  The real story of this war is written in innocent blood that indicts the powerful of their savagery.  Nothing less will suffice.

 

 

Kenn Orphan  2017

 

 

An accurate record by novelist Robert Gore of the American Empire’s war on Vietnam follows:

 

“Between 1965 and 1972, the US and South Vietnam air forces flew 3.4 million combat sorties, the plurality over South Vietnam. Their bombing was the equivalent of 640 Hiroshima-sized atomic bombs, and South Vietnam got the brunt of it. The provincial capital district of Quang Tri, the northernmost South Vietnamese province, received 3,000 bombs per square kilometer. Between 1965 and 1973, the US Strategic Air Command launched at least 126,615 B-52 bomber sorties, again the majority of them targeted to South Vietnam.
 
In 1969, US units fired 10 million artillery rounds, and over the course of the war they expended almost 15 billions pounds of artillery shells. By the end of the war, formerly scenic South Vietnam featured an estimated 21 million craters, which wreaked havoc on the landscape and largely destroyed its agricultural-based economy. Keep in mind South Vietnam was the US’s ally. North Vietnam, the enemy, also sustained massive casualties and destruction.
 
Bombs and munitions weren’t the US’s only weapons. An estimated 400,000 tons of napalm, a jellied incendiary designed to stick to clothes and skin and burn, were dropped in Southeast Asia. Thirty-five percent of victims die within fifteen to twenty minutes. White phosphorus, another incendiary, burns when exposed to air and keeps burning, often through an entire body, until oxygen is cut off. The US Air Force bought more than 3 million white phosphorus rockets during the war, and the military bought 379 million M-34 white phosphorus grenades in 1969 alone. The US also sprayed more than 70 million tons of herbicide, usually Agent Orange, further decimating indigenous agriculture and destroying the countryside.
 
A “pineapple” cluster bomblet was a small container filled with 250 steel pellets. One B-52 could drop 1,000 pineapples across a 400-yard area, spewing 250,000 pellets. “Guava” cluster bombs were loaded with 640 to 670 bomblets, each with 300 steel pellets, so a single guava sent over 200,000 steel fragments in all directions when it hit the ground. Pineapples and guavas were designed to maim, to tax the enemy’s medical and support systems. Between 1964 and 1971, the US military ordered 37 million pineapples. From 1966 to 1971, it ordered 285 million guavas, or seven each for every man woman and child in North and South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia combined.
 
No other conclusion is possible: the US waged unrestricted (other than not using nuclear weapons) industrial war against the far less well-armed Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army.
 
Most Americans think the My Lai massacre was an unfortunate anomaly. That delusion is a lingering tragedy of Vietnam. Plenty of villages were burned and leveled, farm animals and crops destroyed, and unarmed and visibly helpless women, children, and old people—generally counted as VC in the often meretricious statistics—murdered. Some of the villages contained Viet Cong, some did not, and that was often not the first concern or even a cited justification for US troops. The slaughter was frequently wanton, or indiscriminate vengeance for American troops killed or wounded, not to fight the enemy.”
Title artwork is Napalm Girl Vietnam by Brian Howell.

3 thoughts on “The Storytellers of Empire

  1. helenahankart- Your comment was not deemed appropriate for this blog and will not be published in its current form. Please refer to the Guidelines section of this blog for information as to what is appropriate and what is not.
    – Administrators.

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  2. I’m only pointing out how difficult it is for Ken Burns to break from the Deep State. I usually try to parse Victor Davis Hanson’s writings https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Davis_Hanson , with the goal pointing to an alternative path from Hanson’s history. His staff blocks my comments always. A classisist, military historian, of such fame is kept above such things as, “magical” thinking and E.T. tweaking of our DNA for evolutionary progress. These concepts are so far outside Hanson’s domain, to engage anyone in such unworthy discussion would be seen as self-defeating, at least to his staff, if not also to Dr. Hanson. Keep Victor Davis Hanson’s own war writings in mind as you reflect on Ken Burns’ production. Had Hanson cast the script for Burns to follow, it would have been produced in perhaps 1-year and Hanson would be preparing you subtly for a preemptive military strike on North Korea, all under the panoply of his classicist’s reasoning.

    Carefully note Ken Burns’ immense list of program supporters in a project that Burns dedicated a decade of his life to produce. Finding public support meant dealing with the usual list of old money trusts. The usual list of big supporters inevitably bring us to the Deep State.

    If there is no other benefit derived from this Ken Burns series, the notion of the utter futility of war, makes the series worth watching. Each episode leaves you disgusted…and that is exactly what is needed as a peaceful catalyst for change. Namaste.

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